HIV test negative after 18 months now

Originally Posted: 
Thursday, June 28, 2012
Question: 

hi i had high risk exposure with HIV positive girl then i did HIV antibodies test after 3 weeks ,3 months,6months,12 months,15 months,and now 18 months all were negative but i have white coated tongue and pain on it and phelgum from exposure pls advice me what i do now?

Answer: 

 

Hello and thank you for using the AIDS Vancouver online helpline as your source of HIV/AIDS related information.

Current international HIV testing guidelines suggest testing at or after 12 weeks post exposure for conclusive results. As such, your many negative results obtained past that date are conclusive for no current HIV infection, provided that you have not had any further possible exposures in the interim. You may wish to speak to your primary health care provider regarding your oral symptoms for medical management of them; however, you can rest assured that they are in no way related to a possible HIV infection. That said, we do encourage all sexually active individuals to opt for regular STI (including HIV) testing for their safety and the safety of their partners. Depending on the individual, this may on an annual, biannual, or every 3-4 month basis.

I would also like to point out that people, regardless of HIV status, are not determinants of the level of 'risk' of a sexual situation. Activities, such as unprotected penetrative sex or sharing needles for drug use are considered 'high risk' activities. Using protection, regardless of who you have sex with, especially since one can never be completely certain of the HIV status of one's sexual partners, reduces the risk for acquiring HIV in any sexual situation. This is why we encourage all individuals to use protection when having sex.

I hope this helped to answer your question and please do not hesitate to ask if you have any further questions.

All the best,

Jonathan
AIDS Vancouver Helpline Volunteer

Phone: 604.696.4666 (Mon-Fri 0900-1600)
E-mail: helpline@aidsvancouver.org
Website: www.aidsvancouver.org/helpline

Comments

Submitted by Anonymous (not verified) on

Hi, I'm sorry for posting on this post but I couldn't find where to send a message at. In august of 2011, I had sex with someone who is HIV positive and didn't tell me until after. We did use protection, but the condom came off twice and I had stopped because I didn't know why it came coming off. I did find out he was getting treatment. I got my self tested a few weeks after the incident but I know that was too early so I had got tested again in January of 2012. I was suppose to come back in October but I had got into a car accident. It was about 5 months after when I got tested and it was negative. I also got tested again at the end of February, it was the western blood test done in the lab, the first was a rapid test. It was also negative. What bothers me is that I had a lot of symtoms like sore throat, swollen glands etc. The only reason I got tested again in Februray because I found out I was pregnant but not by that same person. I was with someone else. Now it's almost time for me to get tested again because the pregnancy will end soon. I'm actually scared to get tested again. It will be done in August which will be a year from that exposure and I got tested twice within 6months time period. I know I need to get tested again but I'm afraid my results will change. How likely is that to happen? I have not been with anyone else except the father of my child since that incident. When I started seeing him it was october. Should I still be worried because I worry everyday about it and really bothers me. Some days are better than others but I can't get it out of my head.

Helpline1's picture
Submitted by Helpline1 on

Hi there and thank you for using the AIDS Vancouver Helpline as a source for HIV/AIDS related information.

First of all you are to be congratulated for practicing safer sex by using a condom.

Even though the condom came off twice it is still considered safer than not using a condom at all.  Further to that, not every unprotected encounter will pass HIV infection.  Male to female unprotected vaginal sex results in an HIV infection one out of 1000 times.

The results of the testing you had done in Janauary, 2012, were conclusive and no further testing was necessary.

The Western Blot Test you had at the end of February is considered to be the "gold standard" for confirmation of an HIV infection.  Again, your results were negative.

There is absolutely no reason for you to have further testing.  The World Health Organization (WHO) Guidelines considers all test results conclusive at 84 days (3 months), so, if as you stated, you have only been with the father of your child, you having no need for anymore testing, as well as no need for further worry and stress.

I would suggest you not focus on the symptoms you were experiencing because HIV symptoms tend to "mirror" other viral infections.  Additionally,  there are no clinically defined "HIV Symptoms" to indicate your status.  Many infected individuals will get a strong, flu-like illness 2-3 weeks post exposure which usually disappears within 7-10 days.  However, some infected individuals never have any symptoms at all.  If your symptoms do persist you may wish to discuss them with your Health Care Professional so that they may be addressed.

I trust I have addressed your concerns however, if you have any further questions, please feel free to contact us again.

In Health,

Jon,
AIDS Vancouver Helpline Volunteer

 

Submitted by Anonymous (not verified) on

I thought the samething but they just do another blood test at the end of every pregnancy. It's for everything including HIV. Has there any one who has had a their results change after 6 months of the incident and tested negative and the tested postive? I even considered refusing another blood test because I don't want the stress and I'm tryna to let it go but then I feel like if I do it again it may relieve some of the stress.

Helpline1's picture
Submitted by Helpline1 on

HI there and thanks again for using  the AIDS Vancouver Helpline.

First of all, there have been certain, rare occassions, with extenuating circumstances, where testing would be redone at six months.  As far as we know here in Vancouver, there has never been a case where the results have changed at six months.

Secondly, I'm not sure from where you are writing, but in certain countries there is a mandatory HIV test given to all newborns.

Finally, if personal retesting for yourself brings you peace of mind I would suggest you go ahead with it.  However, if you do not wish to get retested, you can rest assured you are not HIV+

I trust I have answered your questions.  If you have have further concerns please contact us again.

In Health,

Jon,
AIDS Vancouver Helpline Volunteer
Phone:  604.696.4666, Monday-Friday, 9 am-4 pm

Submitted by Jason Klin (not verified) on

Hi,
I am from India and was going the website. I am in stress and need advice, it was in the month of april 2012 that I had sex with a CSW (protected) and then I got tested for HIV1 & 2 on 4th september 2012. The result was non reactive, I called the pathology to confirm the generation of the tests and they informed me that the test was 3rd generation test.
It was around 135 to 145 after the incident that got tested.
My questions:
1. Are the tests conclusive?
2. I smoked 3 to 4 joints of marijuana every day since feb 2012 to april 2012...will they delay the results?
3. i used to drink around 80ml of whisky everyday will it affect the resluts?
4. 20 days prior to the test I got my PPD tubeculin test done, wil it affect the tests and window period?
Thanks and regards
Jason

Helpline1's picture
Submitted by Helpline1 on

Hi Jason,

Thank you for using the AIDS Vancouver Online Helpline as your source of HIV/AIDS related information.

I am sorry to hear that you are feeling stressed! I will do my best to answer your questions in the order you asked them:

1. Yes- your tests on September 4th are conclusive. Any test result done 84 days, or 3 months, after a possible exposure is considered to be conclusive. Unless you have engaged in any unprotected sex or needle sharing recently, you are definitely HIV negative.
2. Smoking marijuana have not been shown to affect the results of an HIV test in any way.
3. Drinking whiskey or other alcohol will also not affect HIV testing or the accuracy of your results.
4. Taking a test for tuberculosis will also not affect your HIV test result or the window period.

From the information you provided, it appears that you are conclusively HIV negative right now. I hope this information answers your questions and helps ease your worries, but if you have any other concerns, please reply to this post.

In Health,
Allison
AIDS Vancouver Helpline Volunteer
 

Submitted by Rahul Chadda (not verified) on

Hi i was just going throught the site and i am in a lot of stress . My question is i had sex with a sex worker on the 14th of september 2012 . I used condom and it bursted while having sex so i changed it immidiately . But since that day i was living in fear and i finally consulted a doctor friend who told me to get a Hiv RNA for PCR and a p 24 antigen for early detection which i got done on the 28th of september 2012 i.e 14 days after the incident .Both my test were negative but i still am worried .What should i do ??

helpline2's picture
Submitted by helpline2 on

 

Hi Rahul,

Thank you for using the AIDS Vancouver Online Helpline as your source of HIV-related information. I’m sorry to hear you are feeling stressed – hopefully I’ll be able to ease some of your worries.

Firstly, I’d like to say that having sex with a sex worker does not increase your risk or chance of contracting HIV – it is the activity you engage in, and not the person you engage with, that determines your risk of HIV infection. It’s great to hear that you are using proper protection! Even though the condom broke, your risk is still lower than it would be had the sex been unprotected.

Your negative test results are a great indicator of your status at or after 3 months. At AIDS Vancouver, we adhere to international guidelines that recommend testing at twelve weeks post-exposure to have absolutely conclusive. Therefore, I suggest that you get tested again at the twelve-week mark, but I would not expect your results to change.

I hope this answers your questions – if you have further concerns, please do not hesitate to contact us again.

Best wishes,
Griffin
AIDS Vancouver Helpline Volunteer

Submitted by k (not verified) on

Hi ,

I had protected sex with one girl with two condoms, and i got worried with HIV and tested after 2 months its negative.

after that i had tested one more time after 6 months. test was ELISA its negative..is that trusted and not to worry from now.

Helpline1's picture
Submitted by Helpline1 on

Hi there,

Thank you for using the AIDS Vancouver Online Helpline as your source of HIV/AIDS related information.

Firstly I’d like to note that we discourage folks from two condoms at the same time. Unfortunately, instead of offering more protection the two condoms create friction by rubbing together and this actually makes it more likely that they will break. Using one condom, and using it correctly, is the best way to protect you and your partners. Changing condoms when switching between different sexual activities is also a good idea as it reduces the likelihood of them failing. Using water based lubricants is also a terrific way to helping to reduce the chance of the condom failing. Here’s a good website on condoms and how to use them correctly: http://www.avert.org/condom.htm

I’m glad to hear you got tested since that is the only way to know your status. Any test done after 3 months will provide you with conclusive results, so unless you have engaged in any needle sharing or unprotected sex recently, you can be sure that you are currently HIV negative.

If you have any other questions please reply to this post.

In Health,
Allison
AIDS Vancouver Helpline Volunteer
E-mail: helpline@aidsvancouver.org
Phone (Mon-Fri 9am-4pm): (604) 696-4666
Web: www.aidsvancouver.org/helpline
 

Submitted by mandiee (not verified) on

white coating on rough of mouth horrible taste in mouth feeling sick and constant sore throat 2 years after hiv risk high white blood count 7 negative hiv tests what else could it be

helpline2's picture
Submitted by helpline2 on

 

Hi there,

Thank you for using the AIDS Vancouver Online Helpline as your source of HIV-related information.

There are no symptoms that can be used to diagnose HIV – those who experience symptoms usually only experience them two to six weeks post-exposure, and the symptoms are most often flu-like and only last up to 10 days.

If you’ve had negative HIV tests anytime after three months post-exposure, those results are conclusive and you do not have HIV. Two years after your risky experience, if you have negative test results, you can guarantee that you are HIV-negative. At AIDS Vancouver, we are not doctors and so we cannot diagnose your symptoms or determine why you might be having them. We recommend that  you see a health professional to determine the cause.

I hope you are able to trust your test results and find peace of mind with regards to your health.

Best wishes,
Griffin
AIDS Vancouver Helpline Volunteer

Submitted by Posh (not verified) on

Hi all, it’s my first time posting here, I am in panic and so much stressed I need help. I engaged myself in unsafe sex with a man, whom I learned that his wife died of HIV 4 years ago. He told me about the death of his wife the first day we met and he told me he died of cycle cell-anemia… I stupidly believed him, yes I know I wasn’t supposed to believe him. I first slept with him on 01st October, he ejaculated inside, again on 05th October and he ejaculated outside… After the last exposure on 05th October he insisted that he wants to have a baby with me so he insisted we go for HIV test, but before we went for a test few days later I came to realize that he was a liar as he was almost getting married to another woman, since then we stopped seeing each other. He got married on 27th October. One day, 06th November I was talking with my colleague at work that seemed to know him well and one of them said his first wife died of HIV, I panicked and started calling my close friends and told them, I also called the guy and asked why he did that, he said he is not positive, he said he is 120% sure that if I go to test I will be negative, he even said he is ready to go for a test with me, well I didn’t want to listen to any more of his lies…. on next day 07th November I called one of his relative and said its true his wife died of HIV, I asked my friend to accompany me to a health care for a test, if you count you will see that’s 34 days, meaning 5 weeks after last exposure. The test came out negative, The counselor told me to stop worrying as five weeks enough to detect infection but I am going again for a second test in 3 months, now I have something like fever for past one week, not high but my head aches sometimes, my body temperature is not normal and I feel kind of weak, I haven’t rested for the past one month thinking and thinking, last week went to test for other viral infections as I noticed few black spots under my right armpit after shaving, I was worried but I tested negative for viral infections. Should I relax with my five weeks negative rapid test?i

Helpline1's picture
Submitted by Helpline1 on

 

Hello there and thank you for using the AIDS Vancouver Helpline as your source of online HIV/AIDS related information.

I’m so sorry to hear that you are very stressed out from this. I hope your level of anxiety and stress is somewhat alleviated after reading this.

Your test results at 34 days and 5 weeks are a great indicator of your status at 3 months as our body start producing antibodies around 21-25 days after infection and up to 95% of infections are detectable within 4-6 weeks. That is very unfortunate that his wife passed away due to HIV complications.

It may be helpful to know that it is very possible that he does not have HIV, even though his wife did. There are many couples where one person is positive and the other is negative and the negative partner never acquires HIV. If his wife was taking HIV-medications and they used protection regularly and consistently, there is a good chance he was never even exposed to HIV.

Of course it may be very hard to believe someone, but you are doing the right thing for yourself by getting tested. Getting tested is really the only way to know for sure and hopefully it will give you the closure and peace of mind you are looking for in order to move past this experience/relationship.

For symptoms, some people may experience strong flu-like symptoms 2-6 weeks after infections which only last up to 10 days. Because early symptoms of HIV mirror other symptoms and there is no “checklist” of HIV symptoms that can be used to diagnose HIV, testing is only way to know your status, which you have done. Based on the test results you received at 5 weeks, the symptoms you had (fever, headache, feeling weak) are likely not related to HIV. It may be due to stress to, so if they persist, it may be good idea to seek a medical attention.

Again, your test results are wonderful indicator of your status. Please make sure to re-test again at 3 months to receive a conclusive result which I would expect the same; negative.

It sounds as though you are going through a difficult time in your life and a very challenging situation. I’m very happy to hear that you are taking care of yourself by talking to a counselor and getting tested. If you start feel overwhelmed, panic or anxious, don’t forget to take a deep breath.

Hopefully you find the information helpful. Let us know if you have any other questions/concerns.

Stay healthy and keep smiling,
Yoshiko
AIDS Vancouver Helpline Volunteer

Submitted by baba (not verified) on

sir i would like to know what r the chance of getting infected By HIV after a single exposure to an unknown woman while had unprotected sex for 40-45 sec of exposure with circumcised penis and ejaculated outside. the involved person never had sex before and not any open cut or sores or STD on his penis.

Submitted by monicaf on

Hi there & thank-you for your question.

I apologize for the delay in responding to your question. Due to some Holiday closures and a volunteer shortage, we are a little bit behind. If you would like a more immediate answer to any questions you may have, please call us Monday-Friday 9am-4pm.

According to the US CDC Spectrum Health Website, the odds of an HIV+ woman passing HIV to a negative male partner via unprotected vaginal intercourse is 5 out of 10,000. The odds of an HIV+ woman passing HIV to a negative male partner via unprotected anal intercourse is 6.5 out of 10,000. 

According to the Canadian AIDS Treatment Information Exchange (CATIE), a meta-analysis of 10 studies exploring the risk of transmission through vaginal sex was published in 2009. It estimated the risk of HIV transmission through receptive vaginal sex (receiving the penis in the vagina) to be 0.08% (equivalent to 1 transmission per 1,250 exposures).

A meta-analysis of three studies exploring the risk from insertive vaginal sex (inserting the penis into the vagina) was estimated to be 0.04% (equivalent to 1 transmission per 2,500 exposures). 

These studies, however, do not necessarily account for other factors such as: circumcision, having other sexually transmitted infections(STIs), the HIV+ partner's viral load, if the HIV+ is on treatment or not. According to avert.org, circumcision can reduce the chances of acquiring HIV (for the male partner) by up to 60%.

I'm not completely sure who you are referring to when you say the "involved person." If you have never had sex before, then  getting tested now for HIV and other STIs might be a good idea so that you can keep up to date and aware of your sexual health status.

If the "involved person" is your female partner and she had never had sex before, then the only ways she could have HIV are: 

  • She was born with it
  • Received a blood transfusion from a country that does/did not screen the blood for HIV
  • She shares injection drug equipment

I hope this helps answer your questions.

All the best,
Monica
AIDS Vancouver Helpline

 

 

Submitted by janam (not verified) on

hello,
i had sex with sexworker on 5/1/13 with condm but condom has slipped off and i suddnly i removed mean while condom was strucked her vagina.i tested after 10 days elisa and sypiliss results are non reactive then after 18 days she (sex worker) also tested same tests and results are non reactive but still i am worried is it hiv transfer throug windoe period? still do i ned to test it again plz help me.i feel some time little pain in penni like whenevr body become hot.

Submitted by Gerry (not verified) on

Hello,
I had unprotected anal sex with a male (I'm a guy too) 5 months ago. I got a full STD check and the results came in negative. How soon could I know that it is conclusive that I did not contract the HIV virus.
Thank You,
Gerry

Helpline1's picture
Submitted by Helpline1 on

 

Hi Gerry and thanks for contacting us.

The World Health Organization (WHO) Guidelines consider all tests conclusive at 3 months, so, no, if you were tested at 5 months your results are conclusive and you do not have HIV.

I am pleased to hear that you were tested for all STI's, as many of them are much stronger than HIV.

I trust I have addressed your concerns however, if you have further questions, feel free to contact us again.

In Health,
Jon,
AIDS Vancouver Helpline Volunteer

Submitted by Percy (not verified) on

Hello,
I'm a 21 year old male that had unprotected sex with another male. I have take 3 HIV testing. The first one was done 3 months after I had sex with the male, and I did all the STDs as well, it turned out negative. The second test I did was at 5 months and it was negative as well. The third test I did was at 6 months which was negative as well. I was just wondering how accurate is HIV testing after 6 months, I know one of the doctors told me that after 3 months I'm the clear and another doctor told me that I should test at 3, 6, and 12 months after the unprotected sex. I just want to know if I should still be worried or if I'm good now. Also, I had all STDs check after 3 months but did not check after 5 or 6 months. Am I risk for the other STDs?
Thank You,
Percy

Submitted by davidn on

 

Hi Percy,

Thank you for using the AIDS Vancouver Online Helpline as your source of HIV-related information. According to international guidelines, all HIV tests are considered absolutely conclusive at three months post-exposure. You can trust your negative results: you do not have HIV.

 Unprotected sex does put you at risk for other STIs as well, so it’s great to hear that you’re getting tested! If you haven’t had any exposures in the interim, your tests at three months can be considered conclusive.  At AIDS Vancouver, we recommend that all sexually active individuals get tested regularly for STIs, including HIV – depending on your needs, this can occur annually, semi-annually, or once every three to four months. Testing is the only way to know your status, so it’s really great to hear that you’re taking charge of your sexual health and doing that.

In order to ensure your safety and the safety of your partners, we do encourage you to use protection: condoms, when used properly, provide an excellent barrier against HIV and other STIs.

I hope you’re able to ease some of your concerns – please don’t hesitate to contact us if you have any further questions.

Best wishes,
Griffin
AIDS Vancouver Helpline Volunteer

Submitted by hello (not verified) on

i had unprotect sex with escort in germany in 20 june 2012 but just for short time because this is first i made sex and ithat time i too stress then after that i dont have any symptomes except fever after five months and i ahad no other symptoms i am married and my wife didnt have any symptoms and i am affried to have test

Helpline1's picture
Submitted by Helpline1 on

Hi, 

First off, I would like to note that an individual's occuptation or other social demographic factors do not determine the risk of a situation for passing HIV between partners. Rather, it is the activity (such as unprotected sex) that is 'high risk' not the person themselves. As such, unprotected vaginal or anal sex between anyone poses a high risk for the transmission of HIV.

Since unprotected sex poses a high risk for the transmission of HIV, we do recommend STI (including HIV) testing. With standard antibody based tests, any negative result obtained at or after 3 months post-exposure is considered conclusive for no current HIV infection. This means that you can test anytime now and obtain a conclusive result with no further testing for that specific event needed. In addition, we advise general STI screening because other STIs can be passed unnoticed between partners. 

While I recognize that you are afraid of testing, this is really the only way to determine your status, and will help to protect the health of both you and your wife. Here at AIDS Vancouver we believe that sexual health should not be a matter of shame, and that all individuals should approach their sexual health as a part of their overall health. As such, health centres where STI testing is available should approch testing as a normal part of health and avoid approaches that assign blame or shame.  Because of this, we encourage all sexually active individuals to opt for regular STI (including HIV) testing for their safety and the safety of their partners. Depending on the individual, this may be on an annual, biannual, or every 3-4 months.

All the best, 

Jonathan
AIDS Vancouver Helpline Volunteer

Submitted by Anxious Boy (not verified) on

Hello,

Last night I had protected anal sex (I was the top). I wore a condom and used lube, we had sex for about 15 minutes. I came inside the condom. I took off the condom that was still around my penis. There was no leakage or tear in the condom that I was aware. I'm really scarred and anxious that I might be at risk. How risky is the sex that I had with the male?

Helpline1's picture
Submitted by Helpline1 on

Hi there and thanks for using the AIDS Vancouver Online Helpline as a source for HIV/AIDS related information.

First of all you and your partner are to be congratulated for practicing safer sex by using a condom.

Protected anal sex is considered a low risk activity.  This means there have been a few reports of infection attributed to this activity, usually under certain indentifiable conditions.  Those conditions being:

  • Expired Date on the condom
  • Condom Breakage
  • Condom slipping off during sex or when pulling out

If you experienced none of the above, you most likely have not been exposed to HIV.

However, we strongly encourage all sexually active individuals be tested regularly for all Sexually Transmitted Infections (STI's), including HIV, for one's own protection as well as the protection of one's partners.  Depending on the individual, this may be annually, bi-annually or every 3-4 months.

I trust I have addressed your concerns however, should you have further questions, feel free to contact us again.

In good health,
Jon,
AIDS Vancouver Helpline Volunteer

Submitted by Matt (not verified) on

Hello,

My story is a bit weird but I am an emotional wreck, please help! My concern is of an encounter that took place back in early 2007. I was seeing this girl for about a month before we decided to start dating. I was stupid one night and did not use protection. We broke up but what scares me is that I think I had some symptoms while we were together which of-course led me to freak out. I went for a full STD screening including the OraQuick HIV test in March of 2008. To my extreme relief everything was negative so I began to live my life with optimism and a new found respect.

Fast forward 5 years, I am now married to my beautiful wife (only person I've been with since) and everything was going great. Back in January 2013 I went for a routine physical exam and my numbers were a bit off. They asked me back 3 weeks later and the numbers seem to come back to the norm and they claimed in could've been due to a stomach virus. I spent the next 3 months in emotional destruction thinking that it was cause of my past mistake. I went for another HIV test (antibody finger prick) in May which was negative. It gave me relief for about a week but then my racing thoughts are happening all over again. What if the tests were wrong? What if im infected and gave it to my wife? How am I going to live like this? Worse, Am I even going to live much longer?

I seriously am at my breaking point right now. All I think about is if I am infected I'll have ruined all my families lives. My wife and I planned on having kids and talk about it all the time. I am petrified that that will never happen if something is wrong. Any advice?

Submitted by davidn on

Hi and thanks for choosing the Helpline. the great news for you is that based on the information you have provided, you are indeed HIV negative.

HIV testing during the last decade is now more accurate and reliable than ever before and an HIV test is now considered conclusive in just 12 weeks, post risk exposure. The liklyhood that you would have had a false test in both 2008 and in 2013 are non-existant, provided you have you have not had any further risk exposure.

As to your high level of anxiety in regard to your many ""what if""thoughts, it is our recomendation that you talk with not only your family, but with your health care providers as well. We know that you are a good person who had not ruined your or your families lives and that things will be OK.

i am sincerely hopeful that this advice will serve you well.

David.

Submitted by Amy Amy (not verified) on

so three years and 4 months ago in 2010 I slept with a guy. I got tested last year 2012 and I was negative does this mean I am fine.... especially because there is a2 year window

Submitted by davidn on

Hello and thank you for the question. Yes, based on the information you have provided, you are indeed HIV negative. The window period from risk exposure to a final test  to confirm HIV is just 12 weeks.

David.

Submitted by patrick (not verified) on

Hi,
I had sex with a stranger I met online around 18 months ago. I used a condom. Suddenly past 2-3 months I'm having small patches of rash on my arms.
I'm really worried. I recently moved to a different country and its quite sunny and hot here. Is this the reason for my rashes. I get it for a week or 2 and then disappear and again after a month or so I get it again.
Please help. I can even send you a pic of the rash if it helps.

Submitted by davidn on

Hello and thanks for the questions. Using condom for sexual intercourse is the best way to protect both your partners and your self from all sexually transmitted infections, including HIV. We are encouraged by your safe approach to sexual health.

While we are not doctors here at the Helpline, it does seem as if this rash is not related to HIV exposure and there is no need to send any pictures as we cannot make any diagnosis. While this rash may indeed be an effect to heat and sweating,we recommend that you seek medical attention if this continues or worsens.

good luck and let us know if you have any other questions,

David.


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